Bible Commentaries


Adam Clark Commentary - Old and New Testaments

Bible Commentaries: Biblos - Biblos, the Greek word for book and the first word of the New Testament, is a root of "Bible" in English and many other languages, including "Bibel" in German and "Biblia" in Latin and Spanish. Our mission (1) Increase the visibility and accessibility of the Scriptures online. (2) Provide free access to Bible study tools in many languages.(3) Promote the Gospel of Christ through the learning, study and application of God's word. Biblos.com is a production of the Online Parallel Bible Project. This project is privately owned and supported for the express purpose of sharing Bible study tools online. Most of our work is done by volunteers with an interest in using their technological skills to this end. Please see our contact page for additional information. The Online Parallel Bible Project began in 2004 as Bible.cc, which provided a parallel, verse by verse view of 8 translations. Soon, many new tools were developed to support the parallel site. These began as separate sites, but our feedback led us to develop a single integrated platform. Thus, in 2007 several sites were integrated to form Biblos.com.

C.I. Scofield Commentary - Old and New Testaments. Cyrus Ingerson Scofield (August 19, 1843 - July 24, 1921) was an American theologian, minister, and writer. During the early twentieth century, his best-selling annotated Bible popularized dispensationalism among fundamentalist Christians.

Church Smith Commentary - Pastor and leader of the Calvary Chapel movement out of California. Pastor Chuck has been the senior pastor of Calvary Chapel Costa Mesa since 1965, and has been influential in the Christian community for many years.

Classic Bible Commentaries - History's most renowned commentary writers. Old and New Testaments.

David Guzik Commentary - David Guzik is the director of Calvary Chapel Bible College, Germany. He previously served as the Senior Pastor of Calvary Chapel Simi Valley.

Geneva Study Bible - The Geneva Bible is one of the most historically significant translations of the Bible into the English language, preceding the King James translation by 51 years. It was the primary Bible of the 16th century Protestant movement and was the Bible used by William Shakespeare, Oliver Cromwell, John Milton, John Knox, John Donne, and John Bunyan, author of Pilgrim's Progress. It was one of the Bibles taken to America on the Mayflower, it was used by many English Dissenters, and it was still respected by Oliver Cromwell's soldiers at the time of the English Civil War. What makes this version of the Holy Bible significant is that, for the very first time, a mechanically printed, mass-produced Bible was made available directly to the general public which came with a variety of scriptural study guides and aids (collectively called an apparatus), which included verse citations which allow the reader to cross-reference one verse with numerous relevant verses in the rest of the Bible, introductions to each book of the Bible which acted to summarize all of the material that each book would cover, maps, tables, woodcut illustrations, indexes, as well as other included features — all of which would eventually lead to the reputation of the Geneva Bible as history's very first study bible.Because the language of the Geneva Bible was more forceful and vigorous, most readers preferred this version strongly over the Bishops' Bible, the translation authorised by the Church of England under Elizabeth I. In the words of Cleland Boyd McAfee, "it drove the Great Bible off the field by sheer power of excellence".

IVP New Testament Commentary - Excellent commentaries by InterVarsity Press.

John Wesley Commentary - Founder of the Methodist Church, Old and New Testaments.  John Wesley (28 June [O.S. 17 June] 1703 – 2 March 1791) was a Church of England cleric and Christian theologian. Wesley is largely credited, along with his brother Charles Wesley, as founding the Methodist movement which began when he took to open-air preaching in a similar manner to George Whitefield. In contrast to George Whitefield's Calvinism, Wesley embraced the Arminian doctrines that were dominant in the 18th-century Church of England. Methodism in both forms was a highly successful evangelical movement in the United Kingdom, which encouraged people to experience Jesus Christ personally. Wesley's writing and preachings provided the seeds for both the modern Methodist movement and the Holiness movement, which encompass numerous denominations across the world. In addition, he refined Arminianism with a strong evangelical emphasis on the Reformed doctrine of justification by faith.

John Darby Commentary - Old and New Testaments. ohn Nelson Darby (18 November 1800 – 29 April 1882) was an Anglo-Irish evangelist, and an influential figure among the original Plymouth Brethren. He is considered to be the father of modern Dispensationalism. He produced a translation of the Bible based on the Hebrew and Greek texts called The Holy Scriptures: A New Translation from the Original Languages by J. N. Darby.

Jamieson, Faussett & Brown Commentary - Old and New Testaments.

James Burton Coffman Commentary - Old and New Testaments. James Burton Coffman (May 24, 1905 – June 30, 2006) was "one of the most influential figures among Churches of Christ in the 20th century."[1] He was known, especially during the second half of the 20th century, throughout the Churches of Christ for his exhaustive writing and study of Old and New Testament scriptures. Throughout his life he served as a preacher, teacher, author, and community leader. Most of his career defined him as a teacher and administrator in school systems, congregational contexts, and even as a military chaplain.

John Calvin Commentary - A complete commentary of the Old and New Testament by the leader of the Protestant Reformation. John Calvin (Middle French: Jean Cauvin; 10 July 1509 – 27 May 1564) was an influential French theologian and pastor during the Protestant Reformation. He was a principal figure in the development of the system of Christian theology later called Calvinism. Originally trained as a humanist lawyer, he broke from the Roman Catholic Church around 1530. After religious tensions provoked a violent uprising against Protestants in France, Calvin fled to Basel, Switzerland, where he published the first edition of his seminal work Institutes of the Christian Religion in 1536. In that year, Calvin was recruited by William Farel to help charities in Geneva. The city council resisted the implementation of Calvin and Farel's ideas, and both men were expelled. At the invitation of Martin Bucer, Calvin proceeded to Strasbourg, where he became the minister of a church of French refugees. He continued to support the reform movement in Geneva, and was eventually invited back to lead its church. Following his return, Calvin introduced new forms of church government and liturgy, despite the opposition of several powerful families in the city who tried to curb his authority. During this period, Michael Servetus, a Spaniard known for his heretical views, and the first European to describe the function of pulmonary circulation, arrived in Geneva. He was denounced by Calvin and executed by the city council. Following an influx of supportive refugees and new elections to the city council, Calvin's opponents were forced out. Calvin spent his final years promoting the Reformation both in Geneva and throughout Europe. Calvin was a tireless polemic and apologetic writer who generated much controversy. He also exchanged cordial and supportive letters with many reformers, including Philipp Melanchthon and Heinrich Bullinger. In addition to the Institutes, he wrote commentaries on most books of the Bible, as well as theological treatises and confessional documents. He regularly preached sermons throughout the week in Geneva. Calvin was influenced by the Augustinian tradition, which led him to expound the doctrine of predestination and the absolute sovereignty of God in salvation of the human soul from death and eternal damnation. Calvin's writing and preachings provided the seeds for the branch of theology that bears his name. The Reformed and Presbyterian churches, which look to Calvin as a chief expositor of their beliefs, have spread throughout the world.

John Gill Commentary - Exposition of the Old and New Testaments. John Gill (23 November 1697 – 14 October 1771) was an English Baptist pastor, biblical scholar, and theologian who held to a staunch Calvinistic Soteriology. Born in Kettering, Northamptonshire, he attended Kettering Grammar School where he mastered the Latin classics and learned Greek by age 11. He continued self-study in everything from logic to Hebrew, his love for the latter remaining throughout his life.

John Piper Sermons by Scripture - John Piper is the Pastor for Preaching at Bethlehem Baptist Church in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He grew up in Greenville, South Carolina, and studied at Wheaton College, where he first sensed God's call to enter the ministry. He went on to earn degrees from Fuller Theological Seminary (B.D.) and the University of Munich (D.theol.). For six years he taught Biblical Studies at Bethel College in St. Paul, Minnesota, and in 1980 accepted the call to serve as pastor at Bethlehem. John is the author of more than 30 books and more than 25 years of his preaching and teaching is available free at desiringGod.org. John and his wife, Noel, have four sons, one daughter, and an increasing number of grandchildren.

Matthew Henry Commentary - Old and New Testaments. Matthew Henry (18 October 1662 – 22 June 1714) was an English commentator on the Bible and Presbyterian minister.

Numerous Commentaries - List provided by Monergism.

Ray Stedman Commentary - Old and New Testaments.  Ray Stedman, a pastor-theologian, is one of the twentieth century's foremost pastors and biblical expositors. His message of authentic Christianity is shaping the lives of individuals and churches worldwide. Ray's message now reaches across the globe, for the glory of God and the building up of the body of Christ.





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